wos slogan

The AGM and Bird Fair postponed due to Coronavirus restrictions.

Field Trips are cancelled until further notice.

Map explanation

This map shows where changes occurred in the relative abundance of the species in Wiltshire between 1995-2000 and 2007-2012, as revealed by the fieldwork for Birds of Wiltshire (Wiltshire Ornithological Society 2007) and the shared fieldwork for Bird Atlas 2007-2011 (BTO 2013) and for Wiltshire Tetrad Atlas 2007-2012.

Key

Relative to average

Nos tetrads


More abundant

367

40%


Equally abundant

148

16%


Less abundant

345

38%



Not surveyed in both periods

Song Thrushes breed from Iberia east to Lake Baikal in Siberia and from Italy and the Balkans north to Ireland, Britain and Fenno-Scandia, and in Turkey, the Caucasus and Iran. They have also been introduced in Australia and New Zealand.
    In Britain they occur virtually everywhere in summer, being absent only from a few of the highest parts of the Scottish Highlands. They are mainly sedentary apart from some winter migratory movement of the northern population, mostly to other parts of Britain but also to Ireland, western France or Iberia. There is also a significant autumn passage of Fenno-Scandian Song Thrushes through Britain on their way to winter further south, and some inward migration from the Low Countries to winter in Britain.
    Although distribution has remained largely unchanged population figures have shown drastic changes: Bird Atlas 2007-2011 recorded that the UK population of Song Thrushes fell by more than half between 1970 and 2010. The lowest point was reached in 1992, since when numbers have been rising: there was a 13% increase in the period between 1995 and 2010.
    In Wiltshire Song Thrushes have been reported as common and widespread since at least the mid 19th century. Both the 1968-72 and the 1988-91 breeding atlases recorded them in every one of the county's 33 core 10km squares. Birds of Wiltshire recorded them in 775 tetrads, with breeding in 514. WTA2 found them in 827 tetrads with breeding in 385.

References
The following references are used throughout these species’ accounts, in the abbreviated form given in quotation marks:
1968-72 Breeding Atlas” – Sharrack, J.T.R. 1976:  The Atlas of Breeding Birds in Britain and Ireland. T. & A. Poyser
1981-84 Winter Atlas” – Lack, P.C. 1986:  The Atlas of Wintering Birds in Britain and Ireland. T. & A. Poyser
“1988-91 Breeding Atlas” – Gibbons, D.W., Reid, J.B. & Chapman, R.A. 1993: The New Atlas of Breeding Birds in Britain and Ireland 1988-91. T. & A. Poyser
Birds of Wiltshire” – Ferguson-Lees, I.J. et al. 2007: Birds of Wiltshire, published by the tetrad atlas group of the Wiltshire Ornithological Society after mapping fieldwork 1995-2000. Wiltshire Ornithological Society.
Bird Atlas 2007-2011”-– Balmer, D.E., Gillings, S., Caffrey, B.J., Swann, R.L., Downie, I.S. and Fuller, R.J. 2013: The Breeding and Wintering Birds of Britain and Ireland. BTO Books. 
WTA2” – ("Wiltshire Tetrad Atlas 2 ") the present electronic publication, bringing together the Wiltshire data from “Birds of Wiltshire” and “Bird Atlas 2007-11”, together with data from further fieldwork carried out in 2011 and 2012.
"Hobby" - the annual bird report of the Wiltshire Ornithological Society.    

Copyright © 2018 Wiltshire Ornithological Society. Registered Charity no 271033. Website by Mindvision